Friday, September 19, 2014

GRACE RECEIVES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GRANT FOR CARBON CAPTURE TECHNOLOGIES

September 7, 2011

Posted in: Latest News

Columbia, Maryland – September 6, 2011 – W. R. Grace & Co. (NYSE: GRA) has been selected to receive a three-year, $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop advanced post-combustion technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants.

Existing technologies to capture and separate CO2 from power plants require large amounts of energy for their operation (20% to 30% of the power produced by the plant) and can raise electricity prices by as much as 85%. The goal of this project is to capture at least 90% of power plant CO2 emissions, while minimizing electricity cost increases.

Grace and its research partners will work to develop a cost-effective CO2 capture process known as rapid pressure swing adsorption (rPSA), which utilizes rapid pressure changes to capture and release CO2. Grace will coordinate the activities of a synergistic team consisting of Battelle (world renowned for process R&D and scale-up), Catacel Corp. (innovator in coated metal foil structures) and the University of South Carolina (known worldwide for PSA process R&D) to work on this challenge.

“We are thrilled to begin collaborating with such high caliber partners on developing clean coal technologies,” said George Young, Grace Davison’s Vice President of Business Development. “Grace has a long history of pioneering process adsorbents that offer superior performance in many different applications. This grant further validates our technological leadership and our commitment to sustainability.”

Grace has over five decades of experience developing and manufacturing adsorbents for a variety of industrial applications, including: Sodasorb® CO2 adsorbents for anesthesiology and re-breathing applications; TriSyl® adsorbents for biodiesel purification; Sylobead® process adsorbents used in petrochemical and natural gas processes; and, PHONOSORB® molecular sieve adsorbents that remove water and solvents from dual pane windows.

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